Detection of third party cameras is supported via Nureva’s audio API

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This is ideal for larger rooms that may have a greater number of participants, such as a higher education classroom or a large meeting room or boardroom. Unlike typical microphone systems that depend on mapping areas to camera presets and provide only sound-source directional data or target unwanted sound sources such as HVAC fans, a wall speaker and even sound reflections from a window, Nureva uses virtual microphones as pickup points to accurately locate sound sources.

Nureva Inc., an innovator in advanced audio conferencing solutions, announces it now enables camera tracking with accurate sound location data for third-party camera integrations. Enabled by Nureva`s patented Microphone Mist technology, which fills a room with thousands of virtual microphones, the new sound location device API streams data that identifies where people are talking within a room to steer and switch cameras so remote participants can more easily follow conversations and see who is speaking.

Highlights

  • The Sound Location Device API, available through the Nureva developer toolkit, was developed as part of a program in collaboration with leading camera manufacturers to integrate PTZ cameras with the Nureva audio system to deliver a better audio and video experience to their customers. it was done. Integrations with camera manufacturers such as AVer and Lumens are currently in progress.

  • The Nureva Catalogue
    Microphone Mist technology`s advanced processing power filters out undesirable sounds that make it difficult for remote participants to follow the presenter. Nureva’s API allows camera companies to easily access the precise sound direction, position and level of their Nureva® audio system. Sound locations are reported multiple times per second, and should enable automatic camera adjustments based on active speaker location, or switch focus between multiple speakers.

Microphone fog technology and beamforming
Many traditional audio systems use beamforming microphone technology to capture any noise that occurs within a directional beam emitted by a microphone array. This directional approach limits the range at which sounds can be precisely localized, making it difficult to distinguish between wanted sounds (people speaking) and unwanted sounds (papers rustling) within the beam. These issues limit the accuracy of audio location data that can be used for camera tracking.

Earlier this year, cloud-based monitoring of all USB-connected third-party cameras was added to his Nureva console, allowing IT staff to remotely monitor the cameras and have them working properly in conference rooms and classrooms. It’s now easier to check. Nureva CEO Nancy Knowlton said: Leading CamerasShe is happy to work with manufacturers to bring this feature to life and deliver the kind of integrated audio and video experience customers have been asking for. ”

Microphone fog technology gets around these problems by filling the room with thousands of pickup points that act as individual microphones. This allows for more precise location of noise while more accurately distinguishing between wanted and unwanted noise.

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