The iPhone hack that ensures you never miss a post

The iPhone hack that ensures you never miss a post

The operation isn’t just designed to help with your online shopping. The Sound Recognition feature can also be used to detect a baby’s crying, fire alarm and even running water. When the sound is recognised you will be sent a notification. The hack can help you catch the postman before they leave the property. The hack can help you catch the postman before they leave the property. Picture: NCA NewsWire / John Gass
How do you set it up.

There is a simple way to configure your iPhone so that you never miss another postman delivery. This is how. If you’ve ever missed the postman because you didn’t hear your bell or buzzer, this iPhone hack is for you. If you’re frequently in meetings, on calls, or simply tuned out to the outside world, use the handy sound recognition feature in iPhones or iPads. If your iPhone or iPad detects a specific sound, you can use this feature to send notifications to your devices.

Highlights

  • A Melbourne couple managed to successfully sue Australia Post for more than three-grand after parcels stopped being delivered to their door. Victorians, Wade Short and Veronica Libson, were awarded $3100.50 in compensation for the hours taken for them to drive to their nearest post office over an 18-month period. The Herald Sun reported the matter in February, with Mr Short explaining to the publication some parcels included crucial medicine for their eight-year-old daughter who is waiting for a liver transplant.

  • For this to work, your device must be running iOS 14 or higher. You can check this by going to settings, clicking on the device when it is listed, and then reading which ‘version’ the device is using. To enable sound recognition, go to settings, then tap on the accessibility button. In here, you will see hearing subheading press sound recognition. Set the toggle switch to on and select which sounds you would like to receive a notification for. Man sues AusPost for failure to delivery parcels

 

He said the delivery driver would leave parcels at the door without knocking, or simply leave a card in the letter box without even checking if someone was home. He even said that a postie threw a parcel up their stairs after claiming the stairs were not safe to climb. After his continual complaints to Australia Post and the Ombudsman fell on deaf ears, last year Mr Short pursued the national postal service in the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal for contravening the consumer guarantees of Australian Consumer Law.