Envoy CEO Gadea, who is in charge of office space, explains how to deal with a pandemic

When the pandemic hit, Larry Gadea, CEO of San Francisco-based office services startup Envoy, saw a chance for a breakthrough.

Gadea, who was born in Romania and raised in Canada, founded the company in 2013 to create technologically intelligent ways for offices to run more smoothly, from booking of meeting rooms to mail management. Within two months, the company began focusing on building tools to help reopen workplaces safely, such as mobile apps that manage a health check questionnaire, contact tracking, capacity management, and more. “Covid has given us an even stronger purpose,” said Gadea, 33, whose company works with more than 2,000 companies globally. “Helping people with health and safety has been more rewarding than ever.”

Gadea spoke to Reuters about the future of the office and its altered work routines. The modified extracts are below. D. What lessons have you learned from to manage a pandemic?

A. It’s about establishing unique and super strong relationships with your customers and showing them that you can continually innovate by making sure you consult with your customers and talk to them literally about what you need to build for them. Some companies need to keep track of how many people are in their office and make sure it doesn’t exceed a certain amount, while others don’t have this problem, but maybe they need to know how to do a health survey.

Q. What is your biggest challenge in working life right now? A. Not being able to have separation. Like everyone else, I literally live and work in the same place.

At my desk, I have one of those ring lights, I have speakers, and my gaming PC is on the right. When I’m done working, I’ll play a game, like Microsoft Flight Simulator or Cyberpunk 2077, which just came out and is all the rage.

D. What were your first lessons on the job? A. Born in Romania, I lived in Germany (as a child). My father harvested berries illegally and my mother cleaned houses.

It’s about working hard, regardless of the circumstances. You have to work hard to find your way out. D. What have you learned from your first job?

R. I was 12 years old. In 1999 I had the largest Pokemon Pikachu picture site in the world. I’ve learned that it’s about building things people want, making them happy, and doing whatever it takes to engage your audience. Q. What advice would you give to someone starting now?

A. The opportunity to meet new people is endless because you don’t have to fly or travel for interviews. You can just make a Zoom call. It’s much easier when you don’t have to find a bar and plan a trip there.

Q. What will your setup be like in your company when you can get back to work? A. Of course, we will use all of our Envoy products. We will have visitor logins on iPhone o iPad: every contractor who enters, will have to use it before arriving at the office.

We may not assign desks to people permanently, for example you could book a desk for one, two or three days and when you are not there, someone cleans it and then we will give it to someone else. Q. How has your working day changed in this pandemic?

A. Now I have to cook, which is very interesting. Being in Silicon Valley, I’ve always served lunch and dinner, and sometimes even breakfast. You don’t have to think about it. It’s just ready to eat. Now I have to learn how to do things and take 30 minutes sometimes to do it. I spent a couple of months ordering, but the big problem is there are a lot of containers. It’s a lot of waste and it gets expensive.

So I like to cook eggs and salads and make sure the chicken is fried properly.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is automatically generated from a syndicated feed.)

News Highlights:

  • Some companies need to keep track of how many people are in their office and make sure it doesn’t exceed a certain amount, while others don’t have this problem, but maybe they need to know how to do a health survey. Q.
  • Envoy CEO Gadea, who is in charge of office space, explains how to deal with a pandemic