Clark County Kidney Health Advocates – Winchester Sun

SPECIAL FOR THE SUN

Clark County Circuit Secretary Martha Miller is highlighting the health of community members by observing March as National Kidney Month.

In the United States, 33% of adults are at risk for kidney disease. Kidney disease causes more deaths each year than breast or prostate cancer.

During the course of the pandemic, COVID-19 has been shown to damage the kidneys of otherwise healthy patients. People of color have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, just like the disproportionate development of kidney disease.

In Kentucky, over 700 people are awaiting a life-saving kidney transplant due to chronic kidney failure. Numerous families across the Commonwealth face the harsh reality of waiting for a life-saving organ transplant, families just like Ryan Buffington’s.

Ryan Buffington is a husband and father of two. After experiencing complications from diabetes, Ryan was placed on the waiting list in March 2014 for a kidney and pancreas transplant. In the same year, he and his family got a second chance at life from a generous donor.

“Ryan’s transplant was a new beginning for our whole family. His donor did for Ryan what the doctors couldn’t; treated Ryan’s diabetes, “said Bridgit Buffington, Ryan’s wife.

This testimony of kidney disease leading to the need for a transplant is all too common. It is necessary to take preventive measures to prevent unnecessary complications.

“One in three Clark Countians are at risk for kidney disease,” Miller said. “Hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and obesity increase the risk of end-stage kidney disease. We need to take care of our own kidney health and that of others by registering as organ donors. “

Enroll in the Kentucky Organ Donor Registry in one of the following ways:

• Online 24/7 on RegisterMe.org

• On your Apple iPhone, go to your Health app and select “organ donor”.

• Driver’s License Renewal: All Circuit Employee Offices and all KYTC Offices have reopened, adhering to Governor Andy Beshear’s COVID-19 guidelines and continue to do so.

Clark County advocates for kidney health

Clark County Circuit Secretary Martha Miller is highlighting the health of community members by observing March as National Kidney Month.

In the United States, 33% of adults are at risk for kidney disease. Kidney disease causes more deaths each year than breast or prostate cancer.

During the course of the pandemic, COVID-19 has been shown to damage the kidneys of otherwise healthy patients. People of color have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, just like the disproportionate development of kidney disease.

In Kentucky, over 700 people are awaiting a life-saving kidney transplant due to chronic kidney failure. Numerous families across the Commonwealth face the harsh reality of waiting for a life-saving organ transplant, families just like Ryan Buffington’s.

Ryan Buffington is a husband and father of two. After experiencing complications from diabetes, Ryan was placed on the waiting list in March 2014 for a kidney and pancreas transplant. In the same year, he and his family got a second chance at life from a generous donor.

“Ryan’s transplant was a new beginning for our whole family. His donor did for Ryan what the doctors couldn’t; treated Ryan’s diabetes, “said Bridgit Buffington, Ryan’s wife.

This testimony of kidney disease leading to the need for a transplant is all too common. It is necessary to take preventive measures to prevent unnecessary complications.

“One in three Clark Countians are at risk for kidney disease,” Miller said. “Hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and obesity increase the risk of end-stage kidney disease. We need to take care of our own kidney health and that of others by registering as organ donors. “

Enroll in the Kentucky Organ Donor Registry in one of the following ways:

• Online 24/7 on RegisterMe.org

• On your Apple iPhone, go to your Health app and select “organ donor”.

• Driver’s License Renewal: All Circuit Employee Offices and all KYTC Offices have reopened, adhering to Governor Andy Beshear’s COVID-19 guidelines and continue to do so.